Six Gun Quota

Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!

I find it hard to live with all my choices
It’s time to turn a deaf ear to those voices
Did you ever think to ask my opinion? (Yeah!)
Did you ever think to ask if I’m ok?

I’ve burned down every bridge that I’ve found
Now I limit myself to a six gun quota
I’ve played down every feeling I’ve felt
And I bottled them up ’til the well ran over

Yeah! Yeah!

Give every indication that you’re mended
Take every rule you come across and bend it
And did you ever think to ask my opinion? (Yeah!)
Did you ever think to ask if i’m ok?

I’ve burned down every bridge that I’ve found
Now I limit myself to a six gun quota
I’ve played down every feeling I’ve felt
And I bottled them up ’til the well ran over
I’ve burned down every bridge that I’ve found
Now I limit myself to a six gun quota
I’ve played down every feeling I’ve felt
And I bottled them up ’til the well ran over

It feels so good to be numb
I hate what i have become
It feels so good to be numb

I’ve burned down every bridge that I’ve found
Now I limit myself to a six gun quota
I’ve played down every feeling I’ve felt
And I bottled them up ’til the well ran over
I’ve burned down every bridge that I’ve found
Now I limit myself to a six gun quota
I’ve played down every feeling I’ve felt
And I bottled them up ’til the well ran over

Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!

A little history about the song…
Alternatively spelt as “6 Gun Quota” as Shaun wrote it versus the way it appears on the album packaging as “Six Gun Quota.” The song was originally entitled “Six Shot Quota,” however Shaun felt that it didn’t sound as good. He wrote it about being miserable and destroying things. “The six gun thing is a play on words because back in the days when I used to solve all my problems with booze, it was kinda like a six shot quota, but gun sounded better. Certainly, at times in my life, gun would have been a better word for it.” It was sacrificing everything for being in a band. Not having the white-picket fence and the dog in the back yard. It’s about self-reflection and asking himself what he wanted to do with himself. At one point he wanted to quit the band. When Pat left, Shaun wasn’t too far behind. Being burnt out in the band, Shaun didn’t know if the band should still be around because they didn’t feel like they fit in. A year later, he decided they should be around because they’re different, not whiny vocals and whiny lyrics; the little engines that could. On a far more fundamental level, it was a re-evaluation of the situation and asking himself if it was what he really wanted to do.